Criminal Injuries Compensation

  1. On Oct 1, 2019, the Criminal Injuries Compensation Board was replaced with the Victim Quick Response Program + (VQRP+). The requirements under the VQRP+ are different and the deadlines to apply are much shorter than under the CICB.

     

    • The last day to to submit a CICB application was September 30, 2019; and this was also the last day to request a review hearing or a variation, and to appeal a CICB decision to Divisional Court.
    • If you are in receipt of periodic payments, they will continue to be processed by the CICB until its closure (details surround payments afterwards are still under discussion and the CICB should be informing you of any changes).
    • For more information on these changes: CICB news release by the Ontario Government, News release by the Ministry of the Attorney General, CLEO update
    • For the latest news on the CICB, visit their website.

     

    If you submitted a claim before Sept 30, 2019, see information below.

     

    What is the Criminal Injuries Compensation Board?

    The Criminal Injuries Compensation Board (CICB) gives money (compensation) to people harmed by violent crimes. The crime must have happened in Ontario.

     

    Who can the CICB help?

    The CICB gives money (compensation) to two categories of people:

    1. People who are victims of a violent crime, and
    2. People whose family members died in a violent crime.

     

    What is a “violent crime”?

    A violent crime includes offences such as assault, sexual assault, domestic assault (e.g. abuse by a spouse/partner), child abuse, murder, attempted murder, firearm offences, poisoning, and arson.

     

    Can I apply to the CICB if I am under 18?

    Yes you can apply if you are under 18. The CICB rules say that a youth can apply on their own, or with a legal representative, or with a litigation guardian.

     

    When do I have to apply?

    The deadline for all applications ended on Sept 30, 2019. These are the time limits that the CICB will be looking at when considering your application:

    • Generally, you must apply within two years of the injury.
    • If you were under 18 when you were injured, then you need to apply before you turn 20 years old.
    • If you don’t discover an injury until sometime after the crime, then you need to apply within two years of discovering the injury.
    • There is no time limit and you can apply at any time if the injury happened because of sexual violence; or if it was your parent or guardian or partner (such as a boyfriend or girlfriend) who hurt you.

     

    Will anyone find out that I made a claim?

    If the person who committed the crime was found guilty in criminal court, they will not be told about your CICB application and they will not participate in the process.

    If the person who committed the crime was not found guilty, then they will be told about your application.

    CICB hearings are public but in some situations they can be private, like for safety reasons or if the claim involves sexual assault or abuse. If you want your hearing to be in private, say so on your application form.

     

    If I am the victim, what can I get money for?

    The CICB can give up to $30,000 to victims of violent crimes; you may be compensated for:

    Physical injuries – You can ask for money to pay for medical care if you were physically hurt by the crime. The injuries must be serious, for example, broken bones, serious cuts, and serious damage to your body.

    Psychological injuries – This is for emotional or mental harm you have from the crime. The injuries must be serious. Usually you will need to have a report from a doctor or counselor to prove that the crime caused the harm.

    Pain and suffering – This is when a physical or psychological injury causes you to have problems participating in activities or doing things you enjoyed before the injury. For example, a leg injury that prevents you from being able to walk for very long or play your team sports. Pain and suffering is often the largest part of the money people get. The maximum amount of compensation for pain and suffering is $5000.

    Employment problems – If the crime caused problems for you to be able to do your work, in part or in whole, you can ask for your lost income.

    Child care – If you got pregnant and have a child as the result of a sexual assault, you can ask for money to support the child.

     

    If my family member died, what can I get money for?

    The CICB can compensate family members for many things, including:

    Lost income – You can ask for money to cover living expenses if the person who died used to pay those expenses for you, for example, if the person was your parent. Expenses can include rent, bills and food.

    Counseling This is money you have spent on counseling or therapy to help you because of the death.

    Other expenses – These are expenses that are directly related to the death, for example, funeral expenses.

    Nervous shock – This is when a person who had a close relationship to the victim actually saw the crime or saw the scene of the crime and the shock causes the person psychological harm. Usually you will need a report from a doctor or counselor to prove that the crime caused you to experience nervous shock.

    If you are not sure whether your injuries or losses qualify for compensation from the CICB, you should speak a lawyer.

     

    How do I apply to the CICB?

    The deadline to apply was Sept 30, 2019. As of Oct 1, 2019, individuals seeking compensation for costs that result from being a victim of crime can contact the Victim Quick Response Program + (VQRP+). The requirements are different and the deadlines to apply are much shorter than under the CICB

     

    What happens after I submit the application form?

    The CICB will look at your application and might ask you to get some other documents. For example, if you saw someone for counseling or therapy, then the CICB might ask you for a report from the person who treated you. Or you might be asked to provide receipts for the expenses you claim.

     

    What happens after my application is completed?

    After the CICB is satisfied that they have all the materials they require, a decision maker (called an “adjudicator”) will decide whether you will have a written hearing or oral hearing.

     

    What happens at a written hearing?

    If the adjudicator feels they can make a decision based only on the documents you have provided, they will review the materials and make a decision about whether you qualify for compensation, and if yes, how much money to give you.

     

    When might I have an oral hearing?

    If the adjudicator wants you to give information about your claim and answer questions in person (give “evidence”), they will hold an oral hearing. An oral hearing is similar to a trial. You will be given the date, time, and location of the oral hearing.

    Oral hearings are held in different towns and cities across Ontario. The CICB will usually choose the location closest to you. Sometimes the CICB will offer you an earlier hearing date if you agree to travel to a location further away from you; but you don’t have to agree if you don’t want to travel that far.

     

    Can I have a lawyer for my claim?

    Yes. You can have a lawyer help you fill out the application forms and get any documents you might need. The lawyer can also go to an oral hearing with you.

     

    Who will be at the oral hearing?

    You have a right to be at the oral hearing, and you can bring people to support you.

    If you have a lawyer, your lawyer will also go to the hearing with you and speak on your behalf. In some cases, the lawyer can go for you so that you don’t have to go; and if you are under 18, you do not need to go to the hearing if you do not want to.

    The person who committed the crime is allowed to attend the hearing, but this person will not be in the same room as you. They will speak to the adjudicator over a speaker phone or on video while everyone is listening.

    If you believe there are other people who should be there to give relevant information to the adjudicator, you must tell the adjudicator in advance. If the adjudicator decides to hear from that person, the adjudicator will give you a document for the person called a summons. The summons will tell the person that they are required to come to the hearing.

     

    Are oral hearings open to the public?

    Oral hearings are usually open to the public, which means that anyone can attend. If you asked for the hearing to be private on your application form, you should remind the adjudicator at the start of the hearing that you asked for it to be private.

     

    Who pays me and how do I get the money?

    The money is paid to you by the CICB. The person who committed the crime does not pay any money.

    If you are under 18, the money might be held for you by the Accountant of the Superior Court of Justice. When you turn 18, the Accountant’s office will contact you to tell you how to get the money. If you move to a new address before you turn 18, you should let the Accountant know.

     

    If I am receiving Ontario Works (OW) or on the Ontario Disability Support Program (ODSP), do I have to tell my worker about the money from CICB?

    You should tell your OW or ODSP worker if you receive money from the CICB. OW will allow you to keep up to $25,000, and ODSP will allow you to keep up to $100,000, without adjusting your payments.

     

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      1. On Oct 1, 2019, the Criminal Injuries Compensation Board was replaced with the Victim Quick Response Program + (VQRP+). The requirements under the VQRP+ are different and the deadlines to apply are much shorter than under the CICB.

         

        • The last day to to submit a CICB application was September 30, 2019; and this was also the last day to request a review hearing or a variation, and to appeal a CICB decision to Divisional Court.
        • If you are in receipt of periodic payments, they will continue to be processed by the CICB until its closure (details surround payments afterwards are still under discussion and the CICB should be informing you of any changes).
        • For more information on these changes: CICB news release by the Ontario Government, News release by the Ministry of the Attorney General, CLEO update
        • For the latest news on the CICB, visit their website.

         

        If you submitted a claim before Sept 30, 2019, see information below.

         

        What is the Criminal Injuries Compensation Board?

        The Criminal Injuries Compensation Board (CICB) gives money (compensation) to people harmed by violent crimes. The crime must have happened in Ontario.

         

        Who can the CICB help?

        The CICB gives money (compensation) to two categories of people:

        1. People who are victims of a violent crime, and
        2. People whose family members died in a violent crime.

         

        What is a “violent crime”?

        A violent crime includes offences such as assault, sexual assault, domestic assault (e.g. abuse by a spouse/partner), child abuse, murder, attempted murder, firearm offences, poisoning, and arson.

         

        Can I apply to the CICB if I am under 18?

        Yes you can apply if you are under 18. The CICB rules say that a youth can apply on their own, or with a legal representative, or with a litigation guardian.

         

        When do I have to apply?

        The deadline for all applications ended on Sept 30, 2019. These are the time limits that the CICB will be looking at when considering your application:

        • Generally, you must apply within two years of the injury.
        • If you were under 18 when you were injured, then you need to apply before you turn 20 years old.
        • If you don’t discover an injury until sometime after the crime, then you need to apply within two years of discovering the injury.
        • There is no time limit and you can apply at any time if the injury happened because of sexual violence; or if it was your parent or guardian or partner (such as a boyfriend or girlfriend) who hurt you.

         

        Will anyone find out that I made a claim?

        If the person who committed the crime was found guilty in criminal court, they will not be told about your CICB application and they will not participate in the process.

        If the person who committed the crime was not found guilty, then they will be told about your application.

        CICB hearings are public but in some situations they can be private, like for safety reasons or if the claim involves sexual assault or abuse. If you want your hearing to be in private, say so on your application form.

         

        If I am the victim, what can I get money for?

        The CICB can give up to $30,000 to victims of violent crimes; you may be compensated for:

        Physical injuries – You can ask for money to pay for medical care if you were physically hurt by the crime. The injuries must be serious, for example, broken bones, serious cuts, and serious damage to your body.

        Psychological injuries – This is for emotional or mental harm you have from the crime. The injuries must be serious. Usually you will need to have a report from a doctor or counselor to prove that the crime caused the harm.

        Pain and suffering – This is when a physical or psychological injury causes you to have problems participating in activities or doing things you enjoyed before the injury. For example, a leg injury that prevents you from being able to walk for very long or play your team sports. Pain and suffering is often the largest part of the money people get. The maximum amount of compensation for pain and suffering is $5000.

        Employment problems – If the crime caused problems for you to be able to do your work, in part or in whole, you can ask for your lost income.

        Child care – If you got pregnant and have a child as the result of a sexual assault, you can ask for money to support the child.

         

        If my family member died, what can I get money for?

        The CICB can compensate family members for many things, including:

        Lost income – You can ask for money to cover living expenses if the person who died used to pay those expenses for you, for example, if the person was your parent. Expenses can include rent, bills and food.

        Counseling This is money you have spent on counseling or therapy to help you because of the death.

        Other expenses – These are expenses that are directly related to the death, for example, funeral expenses.

        Nervous shock – This is when a person who had a close relationship to the victim actually saw the crime or saw the scene of the crime and the shock causes the person psychological harm. Usually you will need a report from a doctor or counselor to prove that the crime caused you to experience nervous shock.

        If you are not sure whether your injuries or losses qualify for compensation from the CICB, you should speak a lawyer.

         

        How do I apply to the CICB?

        The deadline to apply was Sept 30, 2019. As of Oct 1, 2019, individuals seeking compensation for costs that result from being a victim of crime can contact the Victim Quick Response Program + (VQRP+). The requirements are different and the deadlines to apply are much shorter than under the CICB

         

        What happens after I submit the application form?

        The CICB will look at your application and might ask you to get some other documents. For example, if you saw someone for counseling or therapy, then the CICB might ask you for a report from the person who treated you. Or you might be asked to provide receipts for the expenses you claim.

         

        What happens after my application is completed?

        After the CICB is satisfied that they have all the materials they require, a decision maker (called an “adjudicator”) will decide whether you will have a written hearing or oral hearing.

         

        What happens at a written hearing?

        If the adjudicator feels they can make a decision based only on the documents you have provided, they will review the materials and make a decision about whether you qualify for compensation, and if yes, how much money to give you.

         

        When might I have an oral hearing?

        If the adjudicator wants you to give information about your claim and answer questions in person (give “evidence”), they will hold an oral hearing. An oral hearing is similar to a trial. You will be given the date, time, and location of the oral hearing.

        Oral hearings are held in different towns and cities across Ontario. The CICB will usually choose the location closest to you. Sometimes the CICB will offer you an earlier hearing date if you agree to travel to a location further away from you; but you don’t have to agree if you don’t want to travel that far.

         

        Can I have a lawyer for my claim?

        Yes. You can have a lawyer help you fill out the application forms and get any documents you might need. The lawyer can also go to an oral hearing with you.

         

        Who will be at the oral hearing?

        You have a right to be at the oral hearing, and you can bring people to support you.

        If you have a lawyer, your lawyer will also go to the hearing with you and speak on your behalf. In some cases, the lawyer can go for you so that you don’t have to go; and if you are under 18, you do not need to go to the hearing if you do not want to.

        The person who committed the crime is allowed to attend the hearing, but this person will not be in the same room as you. They will speak to the adjudicator over a speaker phone or on video while everyone is listening.

        If you believe there are other people who should be there to give relevant information to the adjudicator, you must tell the adjudicator in advance. If the adjudicator decides to hear from that person, the adjudicator will give you a document for the person called a summons. The summons will tell the person that they are required to come to the hearing.

         

        Are oral hearings open to the public?

        Oral hearings are usually open to the public, which means that anyone can attend. If you asked for the hearing to be private on your application form, you should remind the adjudicator at the start of the hearing that you asked for it to be private.

         

        Who pays me and how do I get the money?

        The money is paid to you by the CICB. The person who committed the crime does not pay any money.

        If you are under 18, the money might be held for you by the Accountant of the Superior Court of Justice. When you turn 18, the Accountant’s office will contact you to tell you how to get the money. If you move to a new address before you turn 18, you should let the Accountant know.

         

        If I am receiving Ontario Works (OW) or on the Ontario Disability Support Program (ODSP), do I have to tell my worker about the money from CICB?

        You should tell your OW or ODSP worker if you receive money from the CICB. OW will allow you to keep up to $25,000, and ODSP will allow you to keep up to $100,000, without adjusting your payments.

         

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